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A Weekly Champagne Habit Could Reduce Your Risk of Dementia

A Weekly Champagne Habit Could Reduce Your Risk of Dementia


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A steady Champagne habit was found to improve memory in rats, suggesting that humans might also benefit from a few glases a week

More research is needed, but in the meantime, a “very low intake” of Champagne per week may stave off age-related memory loss.

A 2013 study from the University of Reading in the U.K., which suggests that drinking up to three glasses of Champagne per week may stave off age-related memory loss and delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, is the subject of much Internet buzz this week — perhaps because we’re not too far from Global Champagne Day, which was on October 23, or National Champagne Day, which, conveniently, is December 31.

The study, which shows that certain phenolic compounds found in Champagne can improve spatial memory — responsible for recording information about one’s environment — and “favorably alter” a number of proteins linked to memory storage, does not suggest that you drink Champagne at every meal, but “a very low intake of one to two glasses a week can be effective” at preserving these cognitive functions.

Previous studies have found similar attributes in red wine through flavonoids, but Champagne, which lacks flavonoids, is a relatively new area of study.

However — while the research may sound promising for all lovers of bubbly, the 2013 study was conducted on rats, while human trials are still to come. In rats, improved memory was observed after six weeks, while humans would likely wait years to see the results of a steady Champagne habit.

The paper’s lead researcher, professor Jeremy Spencer, told the Daily Mail that the study was important because “it illustrates for the first time that moderate consumption of Champagne has the potential to influence cognitive functioning such as memory.” A spokesman for the Alzheimer’s Society, meanwhile, cautioned that “a lot more research is needed” before the findings should be used prescriptively.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Drinking Wine May Lower Risk Of Dementia

ST. PAUL, MN &ndash People who drink wine occasionally may have a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the November 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People who drank wine weekly or monthly were more than two times less likely to develop dementia in the study.

"These results don't mean that people should start drinking wine or drink more wine than they usually do," said study author Thomas Truelsen, MD, PhD, of the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Kommunehospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"But the results are exciting because they could mean that substances in wine reduce the occurrence of dementia," he said. "If that's the case, we could potentially develop treatments or prevention methods based on these substances."

The researchers hypothesize that flavonoids, natural compounds that have an antioxidant effect, may be the substance responsible for the beneficial effect. Red wine is high in flavonoids. Other studies have suggested that flavonoids may account for a lower occurrence of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases among wine drinkers.

For the study, the researchers identified the drinking patterns for wine, beer and liquor of 1,709 people in Copenhagen in the 1970s and then assessed them for dementia in the 1990s, when they were age 65 or older. Over the two decades, 83 of the participants developed dementia. Their alcohol intake was compared to that of those who did not develop dementia.

The study also found that occasional beer drinking was associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Those who drank beer monthly were more than two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never or hardly ever drank beer.

Those who drank wine every day were no more or less likely to develop dementia than those who drank it more or less often.

One limitation of the study is that eating habits were not assessed, states an accompanying editorial by neurologist John Brust, MD, of Harlem Hospital Center in New York, NY.

"Research suggests that wine drinkers may have better dietary habits than beer and liquor drinkers," Brust said. "There is also evidence that dietary vitamin E may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. These factors were not accounted for in this study.

"Nonetheless, this is a provocative report providing evidence that there is indeed something specifically beneficial about wine."

The study was supported by grants from Danish National Board of Health, Danish Ministry of Health, the University of Copenhagen, "Else og Mogens Wedell-Wedellsborgs Fond," the Danish Health Insurance Foundation, the Danish Insurance Association, the Medical Scientific Foundation for the Copenhagen Region, the Faroe Islands and Greenland, Chief Physician, DMSc Torben Geill's Fund, and the Centenary Fund of the Copenhagen Municipality Hospital.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its web site at http://www.aan.com.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


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